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It's time to peruse the power. To know the NextLight. And that means it's time to plug into More Power To You, LPC's weekly blog! We post here once a week with thoughts and tips related to your community-owned electric and internet utilities ... and often with a little fun and humor besides. Come on in and get connected!

 

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Keeping Your Meter a Cut Above

SR
by Scott Rochat09/20/2019 3:43 PM
Updated: 09/20/2019

Like many Coloradans, I’ve spent a lot of time as a sports fan. Enough to appreciate that a little bit of space makes a big difference.

In a Broncos game, a foot or two of distance can be the difference between running for daylight or getting nailed in the backfield.

When the Avalanche hit the ice, a couple of inches can mean the difference between a goal and a block.

When the Rockies take the field – well, actually, nothing could really help the Rockies this season. Sorry about that.

Anyway, you get the point. Space matters.

And it matters just as much for the superstars on our meter reading team.

You’ve met these folks here before. Last time, it was a short reminder on dog safety, so that our readers and your pups can both stay happy by keeping out of each others’ way.

This time, we’re talking plants.

Vegetation covering meterNow plants might seem simpler. They don’t bite, even if they sometimes have plenty of bark. (Rimshot.) But things like overgrown branches, tangled rose bushes, or thick weeds can really slow a meter reader down, making what should be a simple in-and-out run into a jungle adventure. (And as I’ve learned all too well in my own yard, rose bushes may not bite but they sure can scratch!)

What’s more, it’s even in city code. Meters have to have 36 inches of clear space in front of them. If that space is overgrown, a home or business may get a letter asking them to cut it back. If that doesn’t happen, the city can either cut it back themselves and bill the owner, or cut off service. That’s not a good situation for anybody.

So when you’re out doing yard work, don’t forget to “36” the meter and give our readers some daylight.

Any way you cut it, it’s an All-Star decision.


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