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Response by Police and Fire

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The Longmont Emergency Communication Center (LECC) receives both emergency and non-emergency calls for service into the dispatch center. 

Approximately 42,000 9-1-1 calls for service come into the LECC a year resulting in the dispatching of police, fire and ambulance resources to 90,000 calls for service annually.

Generally a minimum of three dispatchers are in the center to triage and to determine the appropriate response into two categories, person or property crimes.

  • Crimes involving personal safety especially those involving weapons are the highest priority and will generally get an immediate response.  However, many times calls requiring an immediate response are prioritized based on the information the dispatcher are able to gather from the caller, extenuating circumstances and the number of available officers. Not all calls can be easily categorized and many have unusual circumstances that can change the priority.
  • Dispatchers will  generally use the following criteria to determine priority:
    • Life or injury threatening situations, in progress crimes or situations depending on violence or injuries or the suspect is still there,
    • Crimes that just occurred with the suspect in the area,
    • Crimes that are being reported after the suspect has gone, and call that are considered cold in nature. 

During in progress calls, dispatchers try very hard at keeping the caller on the line until officers arrive, but only if it is safe for the caller to do so.

  • Callers can help themselves and emergency responders if they stay calm, don’t hang up, answer questions and be as accurate as they can in providing information. 
  • When a dispatcher is asking the caller clarifying questions be assured that help has already been sent.
  • Additionally, as good as technology is we can’t always tell where the caller is calling from or their phone number.

 

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