Rogers-Grove-interior



2018 Ballot Issues

Print
Press Enter to show all options, press Tab go to next option

Rehabilitation and Improvement of City Buildings, Ballot Issue 3A, Fire Station Renovation or Replacement, Ballot Issue 3B, Recreation Improvements, Ballot Issue 3C 

English | Español

Rehabilitation and Improvement of City Buildings

Ballot Issue 3A

What are voters being asked to do?

The City of Longmont is asking voters to approve the issuance of bonds to help fund rehabilitation projects required to prolong the useful life of existing City buildings. In 2014 and 2015, the City hired consultants to produce an assessment report for three aging buildings: the Library, the Safety and Justice Center, and the Civic Center. These buildings are nearing or past the end of their designed life expectancy (30 years). The assessment identified repairs that could extend their useful life by decades. In addition, these repairs will improve accessibility, safety, and energy efficiency of each building.

Rehabilitation and improvement of city buildings will include:

Major structural, electrical, mechanical, and safety improvements needed for continued safe use by the public and employees. The buildings with the most urgent rehabilitation needs are: Library (24 years old), Safety and Justice Center (25 years old), and Civic Center (43 years old).

Phase 1: Funded; began in 2018 and will be complete in 2019.

Phase 2: Unfunded; if bonding approved, could begin in 2019.

Why are these repairs needed? Aren’t these buildings working just fine?

In recent years, the City has undertaken a more systematic and holistic approach to planning and completing facility maintenance. Instead of looking just at the pieces of a building such as carpet, roofing, or HVAC, the complete structure of the building is considered. By conducting building assessment reports like those done in 2014 and 2015, the City can best evaluate its buildings and follow through with long-term, cost-effective rehabilitation and repairs.

Generally, it is less expensive to rehabilitate a building in reasonably good condition than to wait until it is in poorer condition and requires more extensive reconstruction.

What does this cost residents?

No rate or tax increases are necessary to pay off the bonds. The capital cost of these rehabilitation projects is estimated at $16.1 million. The total repayment cost will depend on the interest rates and the duration of the bonds but will not exceed $26.6 million.

Arguments for and against funding the rehabilitation and improvement of city buildings

Those in favor believe:

  • These are core facilities delivering City services for the benefit of all residents; therefore, it is essential to rehabilitate them for best use.
  • By issuing bonds for capital building repair projects, the City is able to complete the projects sooner and reduce the likelihood of more extensive repairs or the need to rebuild these facilities.
  • Bond financing distributes costs more equitably across both current and future residents.
  • These projects extend the investment already made in infrastructure for the public.

Those opposed believe:

  • These rehabilitation projects are not essential to the continued near-term use of the facilities.
  • The City should not incur debt to fund projects of this type; other sources of funding should be found.
  • The City should reprioritize City services to meet building repair needs.
  • Taxes and fees should be collected over time until there is sufficient money to pay for the repairs.

Fire Station Renovation or Replacement

Ballot Issue 3B

What are voters being asked to do?

The City is asking voters to incur debt to replace two fire stations and to modernize services with no additional tax to residents.

Replacement projects will include:

Fire station 2

  • Relocation to a larger site nearby
  • New building, which includes:
    • Space for eight trucks (currently three)
    • Parking for employees
    • Training room for staff
    • Clean storage for equipment and supplies as well as laundry facilities
    • Crew quarters for 6-8 employees per shift

Fire Station 6

  • Demolition of current facility
  • New building, which includes:
    • Space for eight trucks (currently six)
    • Parking for employees
    • Training room for staff
    • Clean storage for equipment and supplies as well as laundry facilities
    • Crew quarters for 6-8 employees per shift

Why are these repairs needed? Aren’t these buildings working just fine?

The bond would be used to renovate or replace two fire stations: fire station #2 at 2300 Mountain View Avenue and fire station #6 at 501 S. Pratt Parkway. These fire stations are no longer functional for the needs of the community or safe for first responders.

  • Current stations do not accommodate modern fire apparatus.
  • Station supplies and protective gear are exposed to harmful apparatus exhaust.
  • Buildings do not meet current fire, building, energy or water quality codes (built in 1967 and 1971); they are not compliant with the American with Disabilities Act.
  • The stations contain asbestos.
  • Current site layouts do not permit safe entry into traffic during emergency response.

What does this cost residents?

No rate or tax increases are necessary to pay off the bonds. The capital cost of these rehabilitation projects is estimated at $9.3 million. The total repayment cost will depend on interest rates and the duration of the bonds but will not exceed $15.5 million.

Arguments for and against funding fire station renovation or replacement

Those in favor believe:

  • These are core facilities delivering City services for the benefit of all residents; therefore, it is essential to rehabilitate them for best use.
  • By issuing bonds for capital building repair projects, the City is able to complete the projects sooner and reduce the likelihood of more extensive repairs or the need to rebuild these facilities.
  • Bond financing distributes costs more equitably across both current and future residents.
  • These projects extend the investment already made in infrastructure for the public.

Those opposed believe:

  • These rehabilitation projects are not essential to the continued near-term use of the facilities.
  • The City should not incur debt to fund projects of this type; other sources of funding should be found.
  • The City should reprioritize City services to meet building repair needs.
  • Taxes and fees should be collected over time until there is sufficient money to pay for the repairs.

Recreation Improvements

Ballot Issue 3C

What are voters being asked to do?

The City of Longmont is asking voters to approve the issuance of bonds to fund building and irrigation improvements for Centennial Pool, Ute Creek Golf Course, Twin Peaks Golf Course, and Sunset Golf Course. These improvements are needed to accommodate an increased number of users accessing the pool facility including families with young children, to update outdated irrigation systems, to provide for the safety and security of City-owned maintenance equipment, and to ensure that the City is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Improvements will include:

  • Renovation of Centennial Pool to relieve lobby congestion, provide direct access to the pool area, add four family changing rooms, and bring the shower and toilet facilities into compliance with ADA requirements.
  • Rehabilitation or replacement of irrigation systems and critical components at Ute Creek, Twin Peaks, and Sunset golf courses.
  • Development of the Ute Creek Golf Course maintenance facility including offices, employee area, heated repair area, cold storage, site improvements, and utilities.

Why are these repairs needed? Aren’t these buildings working just fine?

Centennial Pool was built in 1974 and provides a variety of swim and fitness programs year-round to over 200,000 visitors. It hosts nine local swim teams for practices and meets and is the only Longmont pool to offer a springboard diving program. Refurbishments have been minimal over the past 45 years. The proposed improvements would satisfy ADA compliance laws, improve traffic flow, and make Centennial Pool a more family-oriented facility.

Golf course irrigation updates would improve coverage zones and turf quality, maintain the life of the systems, and improve sustainability by reducing water and power usage by 10-15%. The average useful life of a golf course irrigation system is 25-30 years. Some current systems have been in operation for over 50 years, and replacement parts are obsolete. Replacement of the pumps, piping, wire, and sprinkler heads would bring the system up to adopted standards and ensure continuation of service.

The Ute Creek Golf Course is in need of a complete maintenance facility to replace the original farm building that was repurposed as a temporary maintenance facility and that has been in service over 20 years. The building is at the end of its useful life, poorly ventilated, and cannot accommodate new equipment, making it difficult for mechanics to complete maintenance and repairs. A new maintenance facility would provide adequate space for all maintenance operations, including equipment repair, secure storage for vehicles, and protection from the elements.

What does this cost residents?

No tax increases are necessary to pay off the bonds. The capital cost of these rehabilitation projects is estimated at $6.7 million. The total repayment cost will depend on interest rates and the duration of the bonds but will not exceed $11 million.

Arguments for and against funding recreation improvements

Those in favor believe:

  • These improvements will make these facilities compliant with current ADA standards and increase the efficiency, safety, and security of City properties.
  • Funding improvements now will be less costly overall than funding future emergency repairs and replacements.
  • This ballot issue does not raise taxes; instead, it allows the City to borrow money. If these projects are funded with cash, it could take decades to collect enough fees to pay for the projects.
  • Bond financing distributes costs more equitably across both current and future residents.

Those opposed believe:

  • The City should not incur public debt to fund new projects of this type; other sources should be found.
  • Rates or fees should be increased and collected over time until there is sufficient money to pay for the improvements.
  • Although funding the improvements with cash would result in higher rates for several years, the rates would eventually come down.
  • Golf projects should be funded with golf fees rather than being funded by taxes.

 



TemasDeVotacion2018

English | Español

Rehabilitación y mejora de los edificios de la ciudad

Tema de votación 3A

¿Qué se pide que los votantes hagan?

La Ciudad de Longmont pide que los votantes aprueben la emisión de bonos para ayudar a financiar los proyectos de rehabilitación requeridos para prolongar la vida útil de los edificios de la Ciudad existentes. En 2014 y 2015, la Ciudad contrató a consultores para producir un reporte de evaluación para tres edificios viejos: la biblioteca, el Centro de Seguridad y Justicia y el Centro Cívico. Estos edificios están casi al final o pasando el final de su expectativa de vida de diseño (30 años). La evaluación identificó reparaciones que podrían extender su vida útil por décadas. Además, estas reparaciones mejorarán la accesibilidad, seguridad y eficiencia energética de cada edificio.

La rehabilitación y mejora de los edificios de la ciudad incluirá:

Mejoras mayores estructurales, eléctricas, mecánicas y de seguridad necesarias para que el público y los empleados sigan usando los edificios con seguridad. Los edificios con las necesidades más urgentes de rehabilitación son: la biblioteca (24 años), el Centro de Seguridad y Justicia (25 años) y el Centro Cívico (43 años).

  • Fase 1: Financiada; comenzó en 2018 y estará completa en 2019.
  • Fase 2: Sin financiar; si se aprueban los bonos, podría comenzar en 2019.

¿Por qué se necesitan estas reparaciones? ¿No están funcionando bien estos edificios?

En años recientes, la Ciudad se ha comprometido con un enfoque más sistemático y holístico a la planificación y la terminación del mantenimiento de los edificios. En vez de analizar solo los componentes de un edificio, como las alfombras, los techos o aires acondicionados, se considera la estructura completa del edificio. Al realizar reportes de evaluación de edificios como los que se hicieron en 2014 y 2015, la Ciudad puede evaluar mejor sus edificios y comprometerse con la rehabilitación y reparación a largo plazo, eficiente en los costos.

Generalmente, es más barato rehabilitar un edificio en condiciones razonablemente buenas que esperar hasta que se deteriore y requiera una reconstrucción más extensa.

¿Cuánto les cuesta esto a los residentes?

No se necesitan aumentos de tarifas ni impuestos para pagar los bonos. Se estima que el costo capital de estos proyectos de rehabilitación es de $16.1 millones. El costo del pago de devolución total dependerá de las tasas de interés y la duración de los bonos, pero no excederá los $26.6 millones.

Argumentos a favor y en contra del financiamiento de la rehabilitación y mejora de los edificios de la ciudad

Quienes están a favor creen que:

  • Se trata de instalaciones centrales que ofrecen servicios de la Ciudad para el beneficio de todos los residentes; por lo tanto, es esencial rehabilitarlos para tener el mejor uso.
  • Al emitir bonos para el capital de los proyectos de reparación de edificios, la Ciudad puede completar los proyectos más rápido y reducir las probabilidades de reparaciones más extensivas o la necesidad de volver a construir estas instalaciones.
  • El financiamiento con bonos distribuye los costos más equitativamente entre residentes actuales y futuros.
  • Estos proyectos extienden la inversión que ya se ha hecho en infraestructura para el público.

Quienes se oponen creen que:

  • Estos proyectos de rehabilitación no son esenciales para el uso a corto plazo de las instalaciones.
  • La Ciudad no debería endeudarse para financiar proyectos de este tipo; se deben encontrar otras fuentes de fondos.
  • La Ciudad debería repriorizar sus servicios para cumplir con las necesidades de reparaciones de los edificios.
  • Se deberían recolectar impuestos y tarifas con el tiempo hasta que haya suficiente dinero para pagar las reparaciones.

 

Renovación o reemplazo de las estaciones de bomberos

Tema de votación 3B

¿Qué se pide que los votantes hagan?

La Ciudad pide que los votantes se endeuden para reemplazar dos estaciones de bomberos y modernizar los servicios sin impuestos adicionales para los residentes.

Los proyectos de reemplazo incluirán:

Estación de bomberos 2

•          Reubicación a un sitio más grande cercano

•          Nuevo edificio, el cual incluye:

  • Espacio para ocho camiones (actualmente hay espacio para tres)
  • Estacionamiento para empleados
  • Sala de capacitación para el personal
  • Almacenamiento limpio para el equipo y los suministros como así también instalaciones para lavar ropa
  • Cuarteles para la dotación para entre 6 y 8 empleados por turno

Estación de bomberos 6

•          Demolición de la instalación actual

•          Nuevo edificio, el cual incluye:

  • Espacio para ocho camiones (actualmente hay espacio para seis)
  • Estacionamiento para empleados
  • Sala de capacitación para el personal
  • Almacenamiento limpio para el equipo y los suministros como así también instalaciones para lavar ropa
  • Cuarteles para la dotación para entre 6 y 8 empleados por turno

¿Por qué se necesitan estas reparaciones? ¿No están funcionando bien estos edificios?

El bono se usaría para renovar o reemplazar dos estaciones de bomberos: la estación de bomberos Nro. 2 en 2300 Mountain View Avenue y la estación de bomberos Nro. 6 en 501 S. Pratt Parkway. Estas estaciones de bomberos ya no pueden seguir funcionando para las necesidades de la comunidad ni la seguridad de los rescatistas.

  • Las estaciones actuales no tienen lugar para los aparatos modernos contra incendios.
  • Los suministros y el equipo de protección de la estación se ven expuestos al escape dañino de los aparatos.
  • Los edificios no cumplen con los códigos actuales de incendios, edilicios, energía ni calidad del agua (construidos en 1967 y 1971); tampoco cumplen con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades.
  • Las estaciones contienen asbesto.
  • El diseño del sitio actual no permite el ingreso seguro del tráfico durante la respuesta a una emergencia.

    ¿Cuánto les cuesta esto a los residentes?

    No se necesitan aumentos de tarifas ni impuestos para pagar los bonos. Se estima que el costo capital de estos proyectos de rehabilitación es de $9.3 millones. El costo del pago de devolución total dependerá de las tasas de interés y la duración de los bonos, pero no excederá los $15.5 millones.

    Argumentos a favor y en contra del financiamiento de la renovación o el reemplazo de las estaciones de bomberos

    Quienes están a favor creen que:

  • Se trata de instalaciones centrales que ofrecen servicios de la Ciudad para el beneficio de todos los residentes; por lo tanto, es esencial rehabilitarlas para tener el mejor uso.
  • Al emitir bonos para el capital de los proyectos de reparación de edificios, la Ciudad puede completar los proyectos más rápido y reducir las probabilidades de reparaciones más extensivas o la necesidad de volver a construir estas instalaciones.
  • El financiamiento con bonos distribuye los costos más equitativamente entre residentes actuales y futuros.
  • Estos proyectos extienden la inversión que ya se ha hecho en infraestructura para el público.

    Quienes se oponen creen que:

  • Estos proyectos de rehabilitación no son esenciales para el uso a corto plazo de las instalaciones.
  • La Ciudad no debería endeudarse para financiar proyectos de este tipo; se deben encontrar otras fuentes de fondos.
  • La Ciudad debería repriorizar sus servicios para cumplir con las necesidades de reparaciones de los edificios.
  • Se deberían recolectar impuestos y tarifas con el tiempo hasta que haya suficiente dinero para pagar las reparaciones.

    Mejoras de recreación

    Tema de votación 3C

    ¿Qué se pide que los votantes hagan?

    La Ciudad de Longmont pide que los votantes aprueben la emisión de bonos para financiar mejoras de edificios e irrigación para la piscina Centennial, el campo de golf Ute Creek, el campo de golf Twin Peaks y el campo de golf Sunset. Estas mejoras se necesitan para dar lugar a una cantidad creciente de usuarios que ingresan a las instalaciones de la piscina, lo que incluye familias con niños pequeños, para actualizar sistemas de irrigación viejos, para ofrecer seguridad y protección a los equipos de mantenimiento de la Ciudad y para asegurar que la Ciudad cumpla con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades (ADA).

    Las mejoras incluirán:

    • Renovación de la piscina Centennial para aliviar la congestión en el acceso, ofrecer acceso directo al área de la piscina, agregar cuatro salas de cambio familiares y hacer cumplir los requisitos de la ADA en las instalaciones de las regaderas y baños.
    • Rehabilitación o reemplazo de sistemas de irrigación y componentes críticos de los campos de golf Ute Creek, Twin Peaks y Sunset.
    • Desarrollo de la instalación de mantenimiento del campo de golf Ute Creek, lo que incluye oficinas, área para empleados, área de reparación calefaccionada, almacenamiento en frío, mejoras al sitio y servicios.

¿Por qué se necesitan estas reparaciones? ¿No están funcionando bien estos edificios?

La piscina Centennial se construyó en 1974 y provee una variedad de programas de natación y ejercicios todo el año a 200,000 visitantes. Recibe nueve equipos de natación locales para prácticas y encuentros y es la única piscina de Longmont que ofrece un programa de salto con trampolín. Los reacondicionamientos han sido mínimos en los últimos 45 años. Las mejoras propuestas cumplen con las leyes de ADA, mejoran el flujo del tráfico y hacen que la piscina Centennial sea una instalación más orientada a las familias.

Las actualizaciones de irrigación de los campos de golf mejorarán las zonas de cobertura y calidad del césped, mantendrán la vida de los sistemas y mejorarán la sustentabilidad reduciendo el uso de agua y energía entre un 10 y un 15%. La vida útil promedio de un sistema de irrigación de un campo de golf es de 25 a 30 años. Algunos sistemas actuales han estado en operación durante 50 años y las piezas de reemplazo son obsoletas. El reemplazo de las bombas, tuberías, alambres y cabezales de rociadores traerían el sistema a los estándares adoptados y asegurarían que se siga con el servicio.

En el campo de golf Ute Creek se necesita una instalación de mantenimiento completa para reemplazar el edificio original que era una granja que comenzó a usarse con fines de instalación de mantenimiento temporario y ha estado en servicio durante más de 20 años. El edificio está al final de su vida útil, con poca ventilación y no puede albergar equipos nuevos, lo que les dificulta a los mecánicos completar el mantenimiento y las reparaciones. Una nueva instalación de mantenimiento proveería el espacio adecuado para todas las operaciones de mantenimiento, incluso la reparación de equipos, almacenamiento seguro de los vehículos y protección contra las inclemencias del tiempo.

¿Cuánto les cuesta esto a los residentes?

No se necesitan aumentos de impuestos para pagar los bonos. Se estima que el costo capital de estos proyectos de rehabilitación es de $6.7 millones. El costo del pago de devolución total dependerá de las tasas de interés y la duración de los bonos, pero no excederá los $11 millones.

Argumentos a favor y en contra de los fondos para las mejoras de recreación

Quienes están a favor creen que:

  • Estas mejoras harán que las instalaciones cumplan con los estándares actuales de la ADA y aumentarán la eficiencia, seguridad y protección de las propiedades de la Ciudad.
  • Financiar las mejoras ahora será menos costoso en general que tener que financiar reparaciones y reemplazos de emergencia en el futuro.
  • Este tema de votación no sube los impuestos; en vez de eso, permite que la Ciudad tome dinero prestado. Si estos proyectos son financiados con efectivo, podría llevar décadas recolectar las tarifas suficientes como para pagar los proyectos.
  • El financiamiento con bonos distribuye los costos más equitativamente entre residentes actuales y futuros.

Quienes se oponen creen que:

  • La Ciudad no debería endeudarse para financiar proyectos de este tipo; se deben encontrar otras fuentes.
  • Se deberían aumentar y recolectar impuestos y tarifas con el tiempo hasta que haya suficiente dinero para pagar las mejoras.
  • Aunque financiar las mejoras con efectivo resultaría en tarifas más altas durante varios años, las tarifas se reducirían con el paso del tiempo.
  • Los proyectos de golf deben financiarse con tarifas de golf en vez de impuestos.

 

 


View Full Site