Rogers-Grove-interior


2019 Ballot Issues

Print
Press Enter to show all options, press Tab go to next option

English | Español

 

2019 Ballot Initiatives

Competitive Pool and Ice Rink Facility

Ballot Issue 3B

What are voters being asked to do?

The City of Longmont is asking voters to increase the sales and use tax rate by 0.18% from 3.53% to 3.71% and to approve bonding authority to construct, operate and maintain a competitive pool and ice rink facility with additional recreational amenities.

The majority of the tax increase, 0.15%, will be used for payment of the bonded debt to construct the facility, while 0.03% will be used for ongoing facility operation and maintenance (total of 0.18%). The 0.15% portion of the tax increase will sunset in December 2039, when the bond has been paid off. The 0.03% portion of the tax increase will not sunset as it will be needed to fund the ongoing operation and maintenance of the facility.

What does this cost residents?

This proposed sales and use tax increase of 0.18% is 18 cents on each $100 purchase.

The Indoor Facility Would Include:

  • 10-lane, 50-meter swimming pool that can be converted to a 20-lane, 25-yard swimming pool
  • One National Hockey League size sheet of ice
  • Spectator areas
  • Leisure Pool with zero-depth entry, water play features and area for warm water swim instruction
  • Fitness workout area
  • Multipurpose classroom

Pool and Ice Rink History

Centennial Pool opened in 1974 and remains Longmont’s only competitive pool. Centennial Pool serves the high school swim teams of the St. Vrain Valley School District, two USA swim teams (Redtails and Gurgle), a masters team, triathletes, and a recreational swim team (CARA). In addition, Centennial Pool is used for swim lessons, water-based fitness classes, and adaptive swim programs offered by the City’s Recreation Services. Centennial Pool is open 88 hours per week — with 63 hours being used for programming. Centennial Pool attendance is more than 200,000 annually.

The Longmont Recreation Center houses the only indoor leisure pool facility. Attendance at the Longmont Recreation Center is nearly 500,000 each year.

The Longmont Ice Pavilion at Roosevelt Park is open four months of the year, and all time during that period is allocated to programming. All hockey leagues at the Longmont Ice Pavilion are non-contact.

Arguments For and Against

Those in favor believe:

  • Longmont’s population has more than doubled since the development of the last competitive pool facility 40 years ago. The existing pool can no longer sustain the levels of programming and competition to meet the needs of the community today.
  • The construction of a new facility with multi-use competitive pool, leisure pool, ice rink, and fitness area can help meet the current demands and future needs of city residents seeking and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
  • A new facility would give access to residents who have no local access to year-round facilities for ice hockey, ice skating, and instructional ice programs.

Those opposed believe:

  • Construction of this project and payment of debt requires a sales tax increase. The City should find a different way to fund this type of project.
  • The ice rink and competition aspects of this facility serve limited community interests. Longmont needs more facilities that can meet a wider range of recreational needs of its residents.
  • User fees and charges will not be sufficient to cover the operation and maintenance costs for this facility and will require 0.03% of the sales tax to remain in place indefinitely.

 

Permanent Street Fund Sales and Use Tax

Ballot Issue 3C

What are voters being asked to do?

The City of Longmont is asking voters to make permanent the existing 3/4-cent Street Fund sales and use tax. This tax is the primary funding source for maintenance, operations, safety improvements, and capital construction of Longmont’s streets and transportation system.

What does this cost residents?

The Street Fund sales and use tax is 0.75 of a cent, or less than 1 cent on a $1 purchase. As this is an existing tax, approval of this measure will not change the amount of sales tax currently paid on purchases in Longmont.

Street Fund Tax History

The Street Fund tax was initially approved by voters in 1986 and has been extended six times since that original vote (through five-year extensions in 1990, 1994, 2000, 2005, and 2009, and a 10-year extension in 2014). The current extension of the Street Fund tax expires December 31, 2026. This funding source has allowed the City to maintain and improve the existing transportation system for those who live, work, visit, or do business in Longmont.

Dollars raised through the Street Fund pay for a variety of ongoing City services and programs, including:

  • Pothole repair
  • Snow and ice removal
  • Street sweeping
  • Broken curb and sidewalk repair
  • Pavement resurfacing for 350-plus miles of streets
  • Safety improvements (new signs, traffic signals, and school crossing flashers)
  • Capacity improvements (roadway widening and intersection upgrades)
  • Multimodal improvements (installing bicycle lanes, underpasses and sidewalk connections)

Dollars generated from the Street Fund tax are routinely used by the City to meet local match requirements when applying for grants. Matching grants have helped fund the recently completed South Pratt Parkway bridge replacement and the Main Street repaving project.

Arguments For and Against

Those in favor believe:

  • By making the Street Fund sales tax authorization permanent, Longmont will be better able to plan and finance large or long-term projects, including providing necessary local funding for grant applications.
  • A permanent Street Fund sales tax authorization continues cost sharing among all who make purchases in Longmont and benefit from the transportation and street system – not just residents and property owners.
  • The continued renewal and maintenance of the transportation system and a stable funding stream is critical to Longmont’s future.

Those opposed believe:

  • Making the Street Fund sales tax authorization permanent would take away the City’s incentive for accountability and transparency to residents.
  • The City should reprioritize services to allocate the necessary funding dollars to pay for ongoing maintenance and operational needs.
  • The Street Fund sales tax should not be made permanent, as it is possible that more money will be collected than is needed if transportation becomes a lower priority in Longmont.

 

Amending the City Charter to Allow for 30-Year Property Leases

Ballot Issue 3D

What are voters being asked to do?

The City of Longmont is asking voters to change the City Charter to allow for the lease of City property for up to 30 years. Today, the charter stipulates that the City cannot lease City property for more than 20 years.

What does this cost residents?

There is no cost to residents to make this change.

Arguments For and Against

Those in favor believe:

  • Extending the length of leases to 30 years allows for additional public/private partnerships, as private partners are more likely to secure a 30-year loan, similar to standard mortgage terms.
  • Private development of facilities like a higher education campus or convention or performing arts center is more attractive and less risky when longer leasing terms are available.
  • 30-year leases give the City greater flexibility to manage development of land and facilities.
  • The charter is outdated, as many commercial leases run 30 years.

Those opposed believe:

  • The City should not enter into additional public/ private partnerships.
  • We do not need additional development in Longmont.
  • There is no need for agreements longer than 20 years on public land, as extensions of these leases should require examination of current market rate in order to maximize revenue to the City.
  • Residents should not change the charter, which is the master document for City governance.

 

 


 

English | Español

 

Propuestas en la Papeleta Local

Piscina Competitiva y Pista de Patinaje en Hielo 

Propuesta 3B en la papeleta

¿Qué se requiere de los electores?

La Ciudad de Longmont les está pidiendo a los electores que aumenten la tasa de impuestos sobre las ventas y el uso en un 0.18%, de 3.53% a 3.71%, y que aprueben a la Autoridad de Garantías para construir, operar y mantener un centro con una piscina competitiva y una pista de patinaje en hielo, con servicios recreativos adicionales.

La mayor parte del aumento de impuestos, 0.15%, se usará para pagar la deuda de bonos para la construcción del centro, mientras que el 0.03% se usará para la operación y el mantenimiento del centro (un total de 0.18%). La parte del 0.15% del aumento del impuesto se vencerá en diciembre de 2039, cuando el bono haya sido pagado. La porción de 0.03% del aumento de impuestos no vencerá, ya que será necesario para financiar la operación y el mantenimiento del centro.

¿Cuál es el costo para los residentes?

El incremento del impuesto sobre las ventas propuesto es de 0.18%, o 18 centavos por cada $100 de compra.

EL CENTRO TECHADO INCLUIRA:

  • Una piscina de 50 metros y 10 carriles que se puede convertir en una piscina de 25 yardas y 20 carriles.
  • Una superficie de hielo del tamaño de las que usa la Liga Nacional de Hockey
  • Areas para espectadores
  • Una piscina de recreación con entrada de cero profundidad, juegos acuáticos y un área para instrucción de natación en agua tibia.
  • Área de entrenamiento para ejercicios físicos
  • Aula multiusos

HISTORIAL DE LA PISCINA Y LA PISTA DE HIELO:

La Piscina Centennial fue inaugurada en 1974 y sigue siendo la única piscina competitiva en Longmont. La Piscina Centennial es usada por los equipos de natación de las escuelas secundarias del Distrito Escolar de St. Vrain Valley, dos equipos de natación privados (Redtails y Gurgle), un equipo Master, triatletas y un equipo de natación recreativa (CARA). Además, la Piscina Centennial se utiliza para clases de natación, clases de acondicionamiento físico en el agua y programas de natación adaptativa ofrecidos por los Servicios de Recreación de la Ciudad. La Piscina Centennial está abierta 88 horas por semana - con 63 horas que se utilizan para programas. La asistencia a la Piscina Centennial Pool es de más de 200,000 personas cada año.
El Centro de Recreación de Longmont tiene la única piscina techada. La asistencia al Centro de Recreación de Longmont es de casi 500,000 personas cada año.

El Pabellón de Hielo de Longmont en el Parque Roosevelt está abierto cuatro meses al año, y todas las horas de ese período se dedican a los programas. Las ligas de hockey que utilizan el Pabellón de Hielo no permiten contacto entre los jugadores.

Argumentos en Favor y en Contra

LOS QUE ESTÁN A FAVOR PIENSAN QUE:

  • La población de Longmont ha duplicado en tamaño desde que se construyó la última piscina competitiva hace 40 años. La piscina existente ya no puede mantener los niveles de programas y competencias necesarios para satisfacer las necesidades de la comunidad actual.
  • La construcción de una nueva instalación con una piscina multiusos competitiva, piscina de recreación, pista de patinaje sobre hielo y área de fitness puede ayudar a satisfacer las demandas actuales y las necesidades futuras de los residentes de la ciudad que buscan y mantienen un estilo de vida saludable.
  • Una nueva instalación permitiría acceso a los residentes que no tienen acceso a las instalaciones locales durante el año para programas de hockey sobre hielo, patinaje sobre hielo y programas de instrucción sobre hielo.

LOS QUE SE OPONEN PIENSAN QUE:

  • La construcción de este proyecto y el pago de la deuda requiere un aumento del impuesto sobre las ventas. La Ciudad debe encontrar una manera diferente de financiar este tipo de proyecto.
  • La pista de hielo y las competencias sirven los intereses de una comunidad limitada. Longmont necesita más instalaciones que puedan satisfacer una mayor variedad de necesidades recreativas de sus residentes.
  • Las tarifas y cargos de los usuarios no serán suficientes para cubrir los costos de operación y mantenimiento de esta instalación y requerirán que el 0.03% del impuesto sobre las ventas se mantenga en vigor indefinidamente.

 

Impuesto sobre las Ventas y Uso del Fondo Permanente para las Calles

Propuesta 3C en la papeleta

¿Qué se requiere de los electores?

La Ciudad de Longmont les está pidiendo a los electores que hagan permanente el impuesto actual sobre las ventas y uso del Fondo de las Calles de 3/4 centavos. Este impuesto es la principal fuente de fondos para el mantenimiento, las operaciones, las mejoras de seguridad y del capital para la construcción de las calles y el sistema de transporte de Longmont.

¿Cuál es el costo para los residentes?

El impuesto sobre las ventas y uso del Fondo para las Calles es de 0.75 centavos, o menos de 1 centavo en una compra de 1 dólar. Como este es un impuesto existente, la aprobación de esta medida no cambiará el monto del impuesto sobre las ventas que se paga actualmente en las compras en Longmont.

HISTORIAL DEL IMPUESTO DEL FONDO PARA LAS CALLES:

El impuesto del Fondo para las Calles fue aprobado inicialmente por los electores en 1986 y ha sido extendido seis veces desde ese voto original (a través de extensiones de cinco años en 1990, 1994, 2000, 2005 y 2009, y una extensión de diez años en 2014). La extensión actual del impuesto del Fondo para la Calles se vence el 31 de diciembre de 2026. Esta fuente de fondos le ha permitido a la Ciudad mantener y mejorar el sistema de transporte existente para aquellos que viven, trabajan, visitan o hacen negocios en Longmont. Los dólares recaudados a través del impuesto del Fondo para la Calles pagan por una variedad de servicios y programas continuos de la Ciudad, incluyendo:

  • Reparación de huecos en las calles
  • Remoción de nieve y hielo
  • Servicios de barrido de las calles
  • Reparación de banquetas y aceras rotas
  • Repavimentación de más de 350 millas de calles
  • Mejoras a la seguridad (nuevos letreros, semáforos y luces intermitentes para los cruces escolares)
  • Mejoras en la capacidad (ensanchamiento de carreteras y mejoras a las intersecciones)
  • Mejoras multimodales (instalación de carriles para bicicletas, pasos subterráneos y conexiones entre las aceras)

Los dólares que se recaudan del impuesto del Fondo para las Calles son usados por la Ciudad regularmente para cumplir con los requisitos locales de aportes de fondos paralelos cuando se solicitan subvenciones. Las subvenciones emparejadas han ayudado a financiar el reemplazo del puente de South Pratt Parkway, recientemente finalizado, y el proyecto de repavimentación de Main Street.

Argumentos a Favor y en Contra

LOS QUE ESTÁN A FAVOR PIENSAN QUE:

  • Al hacer permanente la autorización del impuesto de ventas del Fondo para las Calles, Longmont será capaz de planificar y financiar proyectos grandes a largo plazo, incluyendo el suministro de los fondos locales necesarios para las solicitudes de subvenciones.
  • Una autorización permanente del impuesto de ventas del Fondo para las Calles, continúa compartiendo los costos entre todos los que hacen compras en Longmont y se benefician del sistema de transporte y de las calles - no sólo los residentes y los dueños de propiedades.
  • La renovación y el mantenimiento continuo del sistema de transporte, y un flujo de fondos estable son fundamentales para el futuro de Longmont.

LOS QUE SE OPONEN PIENSAN QUE:

  • Hacer permanente la autorización del impuesto de ventas del Fondo para las Calles le quitaría el incentivo de la Ciudad en la rendición de cuentas y la transparencia a los residentes.
  • La Ciudad debe cambiar las prioridades de los servicios para asignar los fondos necesarios para pagar el mantenimiento y las necesidades operativas continuas.
  • El impuesto de ventas del Fondo para las Calles no debe hacerse permanente, ya que es posible que se recaude más dinero del que se necesita si el transporte se convierte en una prioridad más baja en Longmont.

 

Modificación de la Carta Constitucional de la Ciudad para Conceder Contratos de Arrendamiento de Propiedad de 30 Años 

Propuesta 3D en la papeleta

¿Qué se requiere de los electores?

La Ciudad de Longmont les está pidiendo a los electores que cambien la Carta Constitucional de la Ciudad para permitir el arrendamiento de las propiedades de la Ciudad por un período de hasta 30 años. Hoy en día, la carta estipula que la Ciudad no puede rentar propiedades de la Ciudad por más de 20 años.

¿Cuál es el costo para los residentes?

No hay ningún costo asociado con este cambio para los residentes.

Argumentos a Favor y en Contra

LOS QUE ESTÁN A FAVOR PIENSAN QUE:

  • La ampliación de la duración de los contratos de arrendamiento de 30 años permite establecer asociaciones adicionales entre el sector público y el privado, ya que es más probable que los socios privados obtengan un préstamo de 30 años, similar a los términos hipotecarios estándares.
  • El desarrollo de instalaciones privadas, como un campus de educación superior, un centro de convenciones o un centro de artes escénicas, es más atractivo y menos costoso cuando hay disponibles términos de arrendamiento más largos.
  • Los contratos de arrendamiento de 30 años le dan a la Ciudad una mayor flexibilidad para administrar el desarrollo de terrenos e instalaciones.
  • La carta esta anticuada, ya que muchos contratos comerciales de arrendamiento son de 30 años.

LOS QUE SE OPONEN PIENSAN QUE:

  • La Ciudad no debe establecer asociaciones adicionales entre el sector público y el privado.
  • No necesitamos más desarrollo en Longmont.
  • No hay necesidad de acuerdos de más de 20 años en terrenos públicos, ya que las extensiones de estos contratos de arrendamiento deben requerir un examen de la tasa actual del mercado con el fin de maximizar los ingresos de la Ciudad.
  • Los residentes no deben cambiar la carta constitutiva, que es el documento principal para la gobernanza de la Ciudad.
View Full Site